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Posts for tag: Bunion Surgery

By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
May 03, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions   Bunion Surgery  

A bunion is one of the most common foot deformities, often affecting the joint at the base of the big toe. Anyone can develop this painful condition but it most often occurs in women. A bunion affects the structure of the foot, causing the joint to become enlarged, which causes the big toe to lean inward towards the other toes. In some cases, the big toe even overlaps the toes. This deformed joint may often become red or swollen, especially when wearing certain shoes or after certain physical activities.

A bunion is a gradual deformity, which means that as soon as you begin to notice changes in the joint or you start to experience symptoms you should consult a podiatrist. While the only way to correct the deformity is through surgery this is usually the last treatment option. After all, a foot doctor can often create a treatment plan that will reduce pain and prevent the deformity from progressing without needing to turn to surgery.

The first course of treatment is usually more conservative. You may be able to manage your bunion pain and swelling by:

  • Taking over-the-counter NSAIDs
  • Icing the bunion for up to 15 minutes at a time, 2-3 times a day
  • Placing orthotics into your shoes to alleviate pressure on the joint (talk to your podiatrist about creating custom orthotics)
  • Splinting or taping the foot to improve the structural alignment
  • Wearing appropriate and supportive footwear that doesn’t put pressure on the toes or bunion
  • Applying a bunion pad over the area to prevent a callus from forming while wearing shoes
  • Avoiding certain activities and sports that could exacerbate your condition

For many people, these lifestyle changes and simple at-home treatment options are all that’s needed to reduce bunion pain and discomfort, and to prevent the problem from getting worse. Of course, if you find that at-home care isn’t providing you with relief, or if bunion pain is persistent or severe, then you should turn to a podiatrist for an evaluation. Not sure if you have a bunion or not? Call your foot doctor.

When should someone consider bunion surgery?

As we mentioned earlier, bunion surgery is considered a last resort when all other treatment options have been exhausted and they haven’t helped get your bunion symptoms under control. You may also want to consider getting bunion surgery if:

  • Your bunion is large and makes it difficult to wear shoes
  • Your bunion pain is severe and chronic
  • You have trouble walking or moving around because of your bunion
  • Your bunion is affecting your quality of life

It can take up to 6 months to fully recover from traditional bunion surgery so it’s important to discuss all of your treatment options with your podiatrist to find the most effective method for getting your bunion symptoms under control.

Bunions, hammertoes, arthritis -- foot surgery is the final remedy many different kinds of pain in the foot and ankle. These problems of the foot can cause severe pain in some patients, and relief can often be found through alternative treatments. In extreme cases though, these alternative treatments won’t be effective, resulting in the need for foot surgery. Your podiatrist will work with you to determine the best treatment option for your ailments.

Bunion Surgery

Bunion surgeries fall into two major categories:

  • Head procedures that treat the big toe joint
  • Base procedures concentrate on the bone near or behind the big toe joint. 

Most bunion surgeries are performed on an outpatient basis at a surgical center or hospital. It is important to set aside an entire day for your surgery, even though you may be in the facility for only half a day. Bunion surgery is usually performed with a local anesthetic and it can be combined with a sedation medication to put you into a “twilight” sleep so that you are fully relaxed for the procedure.  

After surgery, patients are often given a long-acting anesthetic and pain medication, which is why someone else must drive you home. The type of procedure you have will determine the degree to which you can put weight on the foot immediately after the surgery. Some patients may have to use crutches, while others may be sent home wearing a surgical shoe.  

During the first week after surgery, you will need to keep your foot elevated as much as possible. Ice packs should also be applied for the first three to four days to reduce swelling. Limited walking is often required over the first two weeks to promote healing. Your podiatrist may also instruct you on some basic exercises that need to be performed daily.

Ankle Surgery

Ankle surgery may be required to correct a serious deformity of the ankle and its bone structure. Injury, birth defects or changes throughout the course of life are the usual culprits. Disease, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and neuromuscular conditions, may cause severe foot and ankle deformities that, over time, cause pain and difficulty walking. Surgeries of the ankle emphasize the realignment of the structure either around or after removal of the deformity.

Various kinds of internal and external fixation devices are often required to maintain the appropriate alignment during, and beyond the healing process. Varying in complexity and severity, many ankle surgeries are conducted on a same-day, outpatient basis. Patients need to arrange for another person to take them home after surgery and to stay with them for the first 24 hours following the surgery. Post-operative instructions provided by your podiatrist will give you the information needed to care for your recovering ankle following surgery.  

When foot problems occur, your feet deserve your full attention and the care of your podiatrist. Foot surgery can often be avoided with conservative treatments, but if your foot pain is excessive foot surgery may be the best solution. Contact your podiatrist in today for further consultation and treatment of your foot ailments.  

By Daniel Methuselah, DPM
August 25, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions   Bunion Surgery  

Characterized by a large, unsightly bump on the side of the big toe joint, bunions signal an underlying deformity in the structure of the foot. Left untreated, bunions may become progressively worse, causing severe discomfort, difficulty walking, redness and swelling.

Treatment options vary with the severity of each bunion. Identifying the deformity early in its development is important in avoiding surgery. Common conservative treatments include rest, ice, padding, orthotics and footwear modifications.  Many times a combination of these simple lifestyle changes and non-surgical approaches are enough to relieve the pain and stop the progression of the bunion, although these treatments won’t reverse the actual deformity.

When non-surgical treatments fail to relieve your pain or your bunion is interfering with normal, daily activities, Columbia Podiatry may recommend a bunionectomy, which involves the surgical removal of a bunion to reduce pressure and repair the joint. There are a variety of surgical procedures available to treat bunions. The goal of surgery is to correct the deformity by realigning the toe by removing the bony bump and restoring normal, pain-free function.  

When you should consider bunion surgery from your podiatrist:

  • Nonsurgical, conservative treatment has failed to relieve your bunion pain
  • Walking or performing normal, everyday tasks is difficult and painful
  • The simple act of wearing shoes causes pain
  • Your big toe joint is constantly swollen

Your age and health may also determine your candidacy for bunion surgery. Your podiatrist will work with you to determine the best treatment for your individual needs. The podiatric professionals at Columbia Podiatry have received advanced training in the surgical removal of bunions, relieving the pain and helping patients return to the activities they enjoy.