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Posts for tag: Foot Care

By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
October 03, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care   Heel Spurs  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
June 04, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear   Foot Care   Child Podiatry  

While it might not be something you think about often (or at all), the health of your child’s feet is important. Your child is growing by leaps and bounds and certain habits and other factors can affect how your child’s feet develop or if they experience injuries or other problems down the road. Unfortunately, a lot of children end up wearing shoes that are far too small for their feet, which can lead to pain, structural imbalances and certain foot deformities.

We know that going shoe shopping is certainly not a walk in the park for most parents; however, it’s an important component to making sure your child maintains healthy feet. There are many things to think about when it comes to picking the right shoes, and your podiatrist can also provide suggestions and tips to make the world of shoe shopping easier for you and your little one.

Some factors that you should consider when shopping for the right shoes include:

  • Your child’s age
  • The shoe’s material
  • Your child’s shoe size
  • The shoe’s structure

A good rule of thumb is to shop for shoes every 2 months when your child is between the ages of 1 and 2 years old. Once they reach three and four, you’ll want to purchase new shoes approximately every four months. At the point that your child is five or six years old, every six months is a good time to swap out old shoes for new ones.

As you might already know, the bones of a baby or infant’s feet are soft and haven’t fully developed. To protect your child’s feet it’s important that they wear socks and soft shoes. Make sure that as your child’s feet grow that the toes have room to wiggle and move around within the shoes. Bunched-up toes are a major no-no!

Since your little one is growing by leaps and bounds it is important that you are constantly checking their shoe size for changes. Remember that feet swell throughout the day, so shoe shopping should be done at the end of the day when feet are at their largest. If you aren’t sure what size shoe your little one wears, you can ask one of the store’s footwear specialists for help.

Of course, you can’t forget the importance of choosing the right socks, as well. Socks can prevent your little one from blisters, calluses and other foot problems. They can also wick away sweat and prevent fungal infections. When it comes to choosing the right socks for your little one consider the type of fabric, your child’s activity level, the size of your child’s feet and sensitivities they might have to certain fabrics.

When in doubt, you should talk to a foot doctor who can provide you with advice, answer any questions you might have about your child’s developing feet and also provide comprehensive care, when needed.

By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
October 04, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Your feet may be the most underapprecuated and hardest working parts of your body. During your lifetime, they endure hundreds of thousands of miles. So taking care of your feet is important; especially Foot Care Tipssince a simple, everyday task like walking can become painful if an injury or problem occurs. Fortunately, foot care can be simple and easy with the help of your podiatrist. Here are three easy ways to care for your feet and keep them looking, feeling and functioning as they should.  

Practice Routine Foot Care

It's true that most of us neglect our feet, and practicing good foot hygiene normally takes a back seat when compared to other health and beauty treatments. But we need to take care of our feet if we want to maintain a pain-free and active lifestyle. Here are a few simple foot care tips that help keep your feet looking fresh and feeling at the top of their game. 
  • Wash your feet daily with warm water. Whenever you get your feet wet, make sure to dry them thoroughly, especially between the toes.
  • Keep skin soft and smooth with foot cream (ask your podiatrist for suggestions). Apply it to the tops and bottoms of your feet. Do not put lotion between the toes to avoid causing an infection. 
  • Scrub your feet, especially the heels, with a foot scrubber or pumice stone on a regular basis to remove calluses and dead skin.
  • Trim toenails once a week, cutting the nails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails. 
  • In the sun, apply sunscreen to protect your exposed feet.
  • To keep you feet dry and odor free, make use of products like foot powders and sprays. 

Wear Appropriate Footwear

One of the best ways to keep your feet looking and feeling healthy is to wear the proper footwear. Purchase shoes that fit well and offer appropriate support for your feet. The best time to buy shoes is later in the day when the feet are swollen from walking, and to replace old, worn out shoes as soon as possible. It’s also important to select and wear the right shoe for each sport or activity, such as running shoes if you’re a runner. Your podiatrist can help you determine the shoe that will offer the most support and stability for your feet.  
 
Taking care of our feet doesn’t have to be difficult. In fact, incorporating a few extra steps into your daily routine can keep your feet looking and feeling their best. Always consult with your podiatrist if you experience pain or discomfort in your feet or ankles. And if you are diabetic, you run a much higher risk of developing foot problems, so visit your podiatrist regularly for foot care tips and exams!
By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
January 03, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Diabetes causes a condition of painful nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy can affect your entire body, but your legs and feet are parts of your body that are more prone to serious health problems. Damage to the nerves can cause the loss of feeling in your feet, making it difficult to detect extreme temperatures and pain as easily or readily as someone who does not have diabetes. 

This is why diabetics get infections so frequently from something as simple as a small cut or blister on the foot. When a person is unable to detect a foot wound, it can easily become infected, leading to more serious complications and even amputation in the most severe cases. With that being said, understanding the connection between foot care and diabetes is important to avoid more serious health problems. If you are diabetic, it is important talk to your podiatrist about the best ways to care for your feet. 

What is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy?

Typically in diabetic peripheral neuropathy of the feet, you will begin to notice sensory changes, such as numbness or tingling in your toes. Initially, these symptoms may come and go, but in time they will be constant. When experiencing these symptoms, they may interfere with your sleep or cause you to awaken from your sleep. Over a period of time, these disturbances may cause a loss of feeling that may even hinder your ability to detect the tightness of your shoes. Even a pebble in your shoe can go unnoticed as time goes on, which can injure your foot.  
 
Neuropathy is the leading cause of ulcers or holes that occur in the feet, as well as infections. Additionally, neuropathy is the leading cause of the loss of toes and even amputation in advanced cases. If nerve compression goes untreated, the nerve itself can become deprived of oxygen and nutrients. This can cause the nerve to die over time, resulting in numb feet. In many patients, surgery can be performed to relieve these various sites of nerve compression in order to relieve the burning, tingling and pain, or even to restore sensation to your feet in some cases. 

Prevent Complications of Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s crucial to examine your feet every day and after every injury, regardless of how minor you may think the injury is. If you notice redness, swelling, persistent pain, numbness, tingling or any other unusual signs on any part of your foot, call your podiatrist immediately, as this could signify serious health problems. 
 
We also recommend that, if you have diabetes, you should visit us for annual checkups. We work with you to detect signs of changes, broken skin or ulcers that can be detrimental to the health of your feet and body. At our practice we can also check your blood circulation, identify loss of sensation or detect areas of high pressure - all of which require professional medical attention. 
 
Early detection, simple care and regular inspections can go a long way to avoid serious foot complications related to diabetes. Diabetes is serious, especially when it comes to your feet. If you have diabetes, talk with your podiatrist about what you can do now to keep your feet safe, strong and healthy. 
By Daniel Methuselah, DPM
October 15, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care   Baby Feet  

A child's feet grow rapidly during the first year, reaching almost half of their adult foot size. This is why podiatrists consider the first year to be the most important in the development of the feet. Proper care at a young age is essential for healthy development.  Since many adult foot ailments develop in childhood, periodic visits to Wellness Blvd Irmo, SC and basic foot care can help minimize these problems later in life.

A child’s feet are formed from soft, pliable cartilage which makes them more susceptible to deformities. A young child can be affected by foot conditions such as:

  • Intoeing
  • Outoeing
  • Flat feet
  • Warts
  • Heel pain

Tips for Parents

Parents can help promote normal, healthy foot development for their baby.

  • Examine your baby’s feet regularly.  If you detect any unusual signs, contact your child’s pediatrician or podiatrist right away.
  • Encourage exercise.  Lying uncovered allows the baby to kick and move feet and toes freely so not to inhibit normal development.
  • Cover feet loosely.  Tight clothing or covers restrict movement.
  • Alternate your baby’s position several times a day.  Lying too long in one spot may place unnecessary strain on the feet and legs.

Growing Up

As your baby continues to grow and develop, so will the feet. It may be necessary to change shoe and sock size every few months, as tight-fitting footwear can aggravate preexisting conditions.  After the first steps are taken, you should also carefully observe walking patterns. Intoeing, outoeing, and gait abnormalities can be corrected when they are detected early.

A baby’s feet will carry them throughout life, so it’s important to begin foot care at a young age. Neglecting your child’s foot health invites problems in other parts of the body, such as the back and legs.  Whenever you have questions about your child’s foot health, or if you suspect a problem with the development of your child’s feet, contact our Irmo office.